How and Why To Re-Rout DNS Through Your Computer or Phone

In a few of my previous tutorials I briefly touch on DNS re-routing, but never really get into it in full details, so I figured why not here today? Before moving forward, learning to re-route your DNS is important because it is a means of protecting your personal data, devices, network connectivity and internet traffic away from the spying or prying eyes of your Internet Service Provider (ISP), Government and any other interested 3rd parties, such as advertisers or even hackers. As for how DNS works or how switching it effects your internet connectivity, I think the short video below is the best demonstration. It explains how DNS re-routing configures your computer or phone to connect through a DNS server first, in order to connect to a website second – instead of connecting to a server owned by your ISP to connect to that same website, get it?

While there are number of ways to re-route your DNS and different services providers to choose from, for the purposes of this article, I consider the following to be the worlds best “Top 3” – Cloudflare DNS, IBM Quad 9 and Google’s Public DNS. As you can read below, each of which have their own unique benefits.

Cloudflare DNS:

Ipv4: 1.1.1.1
Ipv6: 1.0.0.1
Ipv6: 2606:4700:4700::1111
Ipv6: 2606:4700:4700::1001

Cloudflare DNS is my personal DNS provider of choice, installed on both my computer and phone. As for why I choose them, this is because Cloudflare DNS anonymizes IP Addresses, deletes logs daily and doesn’t mine any user data. Additionally, Cloudlfare DNS also offers security features not available in many other public DNS service providers, such as “Query Name Minimization” – which diminishes privacy leakage by sending minimal query names to authoritative DNS servers when connecting to websites.

Learn More – Cloudflare DNS: https://www.cloudflare.com/learning/dns/what-is-1.1.1.1/

IBM Quad 9:

Ipv4: 9.9.9.9
Ipv4: 149.112.112.112
Ipv6: 2620:fe::fe
Ipv6: 2620:fe::9

IBM Quad 9. Whereas Cloudflare may be more beneficial for activists and researchers, IBM Quad 9 on the other hand is probably of more benefit to your average home owner, parent or business owner. This is because Quad 9 routes your internet connections through DNS servers that actively blacklist known malicious websites, as well as websites which have previously been compromised by data breaches. In addition to this, Quad 9 servers also protect your internet’s incoming/outgoing connections as a means of preventing any of your devices from being caught up in a botnet. Quite simply, this means that while on Quad 9 servers, you never have to worry about any of your devices being hijacked or caught up in any sort of DDoS or crypto-mining campaigns, even smart devices connected to the “Internet of Things” (IoT).

Learn More – IBM Quad9: https://www.quad9.net/

Google Public DNS:

Ipv4: 8.8.8.8
Ipv4: 8.8.4.4
Ipv6: 2001:4860:4860::8888
Ipv6: 2001:4860:4860::8844

Google Public DNS servers on the other hand are ideal for people in countries such as Ethiopia, Sudan, Turkey, Syria, North Korea and the like which are all known to have restricted, censored, shut down and/or sealed off access to certain portions of their national internet in the past. In fact, as you can see via the picture provided below, activists affiliated with Anonymous Cyber Guerrilla have literally spray painted Google’s 8.8.8.8 DNS in public places in times of National crises as a means of raising awareness and alerting citizens how to bypass local internet restrictions imposed by their Government – opening people back up to the global world-wide-web. In addition to bypassing regional internet restrictions, compared to ISP’s in some 3rd world regions, switching to Google DNS servers might actually help improve or speed up your load time/internet connection.

Learn More – Google Public DNS: https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/

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How To Switch DNS On Windows?

1.) Go to the start menu and type in “Settings,” press enter and then select “Network & Internet” options

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2.) Click on “Change Adapter Options

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3.) Select the “Internet Connection” your are using then click on the “Properties” button when it pops up

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4.) Scroll through and individually select/click on “Internet Protocol Version IPv4” and “Internet Protocol Version IPv6” then press the “Properties” button again

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5.) Select “Use The Following DNS Server Address” and manually enter in your DNS service provider of choice – see IPv4 and IPv6 Addresses above – then press “OK

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That’s it, really. Generally speaking, the setup should be the same on your Apple PC just as well. It’s also important to note that you can actually do a mix-match of the addresses listed above. For example, you can use Cloudflare for IPv4, but then choose IBM for IPv6 – vice versa – and your internet connection will not be broken. Just so you are aware, while IPv2 usually signifies the country of origin or device where you are coming from, but most all devices on the world-wide-web these days connect to websites via IPv4 connections, making IPv4 the most important settings to modify.

How To Switch DNS On Phone?

Changing or re-routing the DNS settings on your phone can either be incredibly complicated or incredibly simple, depending on your level of skill/expertise. However, far and away the easiest means to go about accomplishing this is by installing a 3rd party App – either by going to your App, Apple or Google Play store(s). Simply just type in “Change DNS” to your search settings, press enter, and this should open up a whole host of options to choose from. Simply choose the one that you feel is best for you and enter in the Addresses listed above.

If You are A Little More Advanced…

OpenNIC Project. For those of you whom may be unfamiliar, “OpenNIC (also referred to as the OpenNIC Project) is a user owned and controlled top-level Network Information Center offering a non-national alternative to traditional Top-Level Domain (TLD) registries; such as ICANN. Instead, OpenNIC only operates namespaces and namespaces the OpenNIC has peering agreements with.

In other words, they are open DNS addresses, servers and proxies not indexed by global internet agencies or their Governments. Stay classy mi amigos 😉

Learn More -OpenNIC Project: https://www.opennic.org/

See Also – CyberGuerrilla Internet Censorship Care Package: https://www.cyberguerrilla.org/blog/anti-censorship-carepackage/

Ghostbin Servers Crashed for +48 Hours

** UPDATE: On December 25th 2018 Dustin Howett, founder/owner of Ghostbin reached out to Rogue Media Labs to announce that Ghostbin servers were down because he had run out of disc storage space for the website, and hadn’t gotten around to updating it due to the holidays. Ghostbin was back online and operational by mid day 12/25/2018. **

It has not been a very “Merry Christmas” for the popular web based copy and paste service known as Ghostbin, whose servers appear to have been crashed for the better part of the weekend – #TangoDown. Dating back to December 22nd 2018, all visitors to ghostbin.com have been greeted with an “ERROR 503: Service Unavailable” message – indicating that the server is operating above capacity, or down for scheduled maintenance. However, given that Ghostbin never released a statement announcing changes or updates to its website, and there is currently no maintenance messages posted, what we are seeing is more likely than not the result of some sort of cyber attack against the service.

Interestingly enough, Ghostbin does utilize Cloudfare as an authoritative DNS protecting the front end of their name servers, but Cloudflare is only willing to stand in front of a website up until a DDoS attack of 1 TBPS. This certainly wouldn’t be the first time Ghostbin has been hit by a DDoS attack, but if this is indeed the case and Ghostbin isn’t simply just undergoing routine/scheduled maintenance, then we are all witnessing a world-class DDoS attack here.

As of the early morning hours of Tuesday, December 25th 2018, Ghostbin servers remain down and Rogue Media Labs has not been able to reach the sites owners for comment. At the present moment in time no one or groups has claimed responsibility for the attack, and the service has been down for a little over 51 hours at this point.

https://twitter.com/ergo_hacker/status/1077028058123649024

https://twitter.com/BrizkGlitchesYT/status/1076681010874441728

Central Bank of The Bahamas Crashed for +28 Hours by SHIZEN

In conjunction with #OpIcarus2018, hacker “SHIZEN” of Pryzraky has launched a series of web attacks and DDoS against central banks worldwide. Chief among them was an attack on the Central Bank of the Bahamas, which was downed for well over 24 hours between the dates of December 12th to 14th, 2018. As of 9 a.m. Friday morning the banks official website appears to be back up and running again, but the sites administrators have had to install Cloudflare just to make this happen.

Upon investigating the website further, the sites theme manager and developer, Thyme Online, has still yet to even install an active SSL certificate for the website and its front-end still suffers from a lack of basic and fundamental security measures. According to their web page, the Central Bank of the Bahamas currently manages over 55 million dollars in assets, but it remains unclear how much a financial impact the latest cyber attack has had on their business.

According to SHIZEN, “The Central Bank Of Bahamas it’s an easy target, the website is protected by Cloudflare but as long as the DDoS doesn’t exceed the 1 TBPS limit. I have attacked with a Python Script named: http://leet.py & http://blastaered.pl The website has been taken down for 28 hours before it was changed over to Cloudflare, now if you make an check-host you can see an error “503 (Service Temporarily Unavailable)”, the website works because he have changed the Cloudflare, so I think I’ll try to take down it with an IRC Botnet or an MIRAI next.Rogue Security Labs has reached out to the Bahamas Central Bank for comment on the incident, but as of December 15th 2018 the bank has declined to respond.

Website Hit: hxxp://centralbankbahamas.com
American Bank Proxy: 104.31.86.108
Target Behind Cloudflare: 24.244.141.213

https://twitter.com/zglobal_/status/1073103906119520256

https://twitter.com/LulzSeguridad/status/1073472075979997184

https://twitter.com/zglobal_/status/1073460209249673216