Part 1: Invaluable Resources Every Political Researcher, Historian & Activist Should Have

In part 1 of 2 of this particular series I am going to disclose the locations of nearly every library of declassified documents you can find online dating back to World War II, specifically implicating the United States Government. Perhaps most importantly, all of the documents contained within them were won via Freedom of Information Act requests and/or lawsuits. In part 2 of this series, I will assemble all of the online links you need to begin requesting new information from the Government for yourself, for free, with just the click of a button and the filling out of an application. But without any further adieu……

For those of you whom are not aware, over the course of the last two decades or so many legal experts, researchers and activists have been lobbying very hard to make government records more accessible to the general public. However, even in victory, rarely if ever do these successes ever get reported in the news. To this effect, below you can find various archives and repositories full of hundreds of thousands of newly declassified documents/files dating all the way back to the end of WW2 and up on through the 2000’s – all disclosed via “Freedom of Information Act” (FOIA) lawsuits. In the case of the CIA for example, these archives used to only be accessible via one computer located in Washington DC – until the entire archive was published/released online for the first time in 2017, that is.

Below is a list of open/available databases hosting countless records across different US Government agencies, almost all of them classified at one point or another throughout America’s past. I put them all together here today not only for my own resources, but also because I believe them to be invaluable resources for anyone reporting on modern US politics or US history, including educators, as a means to understand various situations or circumstances as they existed throughout the past – leading to the politics of today.

NSA FOIA Online Archive/Repository: https://nsarchive.gwu.edu/virtual-reading-room
NSA Declassification & Transparency Index: https://www.nsa.gov/news-features/declassified-documents/

US Department of State Archive/Repository: https://foia.state.gov/Search/Search.aspx

CIA Online Archive/Repository: https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/home

The Vault – FBI Archive/Repository: https://vault.fbi.gov/search

Reading Room – National Archives: https://www.archives.gov/foia/electronic-reading-room

Reading Room – Library of Congress: http://www.loc.gov/rr/main/

Department of Homeland Security Library: https://www.dhs.gov/foia-library

Available Documents – Department of Justice: https://www.justice.gov/oip/available-documents-all-doj-components

Executive Services Directorate – White House: https://www.esd.whs.mil/FOID/DoD-Records/

Electronic Library – NASA: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/pao/FOIA/err.htm

DoD – US Inspector General Reading Room: https://www.dodig.mil/FOIA/FOIA-Reading-Room/

US Army – FOIA Library: https://www.foia.army.mil/readingroom/index.aspx

US Navy FOIA Reading Room: https://www.secnav.navy.mil/foia/readingroom/SitePages/Home.aspx

US Airforce FOIA Library: https://www.foia.af.mil/Library/

Donald Trump Issues New Cybersecurity Executive Order Into Law

Yesterday, May 2nd 2019, Donald Trump singed a new Executive Order into law designed to strengthen the US Governments National cybersecurity work force. The move comes less than two days after the Department of Homeland Security issued a new Federal directive demanding that cybersecurity experts working for the US Government drastically speed up response time and patches to any known vulnerabilities or cyber incidents effecting their systems. It is therefore only natural to assume that the US Government would need to hire more personnel to pull this off – hence Trumps order yesterday.

Executive Order On America’s Cybersecurity Work Force: https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-americas-cybersecurity-workforce/

In a statement attached to the signing of the Executive Order posted through WhiteHouse.gov, Trump stated “America built the internet and shared it with the world; now we will do our part to secure and preserve cyberspace for future generations.” I was unable to find a pdf version of the order online, but have provided the full text of the order, along with a summary of its highlights below.

Highlights of New Executive Order:

The Executive Order will promote cybersecurity work within the Government, including through a new President’s Cup Cybersecurity Competition.

The Administration will develop a rotational program where Federal employees can expand their cybersecurity expertise through temporary reassignments to other agencies.

The Executive Order encourages widespread adoption of the cybersecurity workforce framework created by the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE).
The NICE Framework is a helpful reference for identifying, recruiting, developing, and retaining cybersecurity talent.

The Executive Order aims to close cybersecurity skills gaps for the cyber-physical systems that our defense and critical infrastructure rely on.

Federal agencies will identify cybersecurity aptitude assessments that they can use to reskill employees with potential in the cybersecurity field.

The Administration will establish the Presidential Cybersecurity Education Awards, recognizing excellent elementary and secondary school educators teaching cybersecurity-related content.

Full Text of Order:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and to better ensure continued American economic prosperity and national security, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1.  Policy.  (a)  America’s cybersecurity workforce is a strategic asset that protects the American people, the homeland, and the American way of life.  The National Cyber Strategy, the President’s 2018 Management Agenda, and Executive Order 13800 of May 11, 2017 (Strengthening the Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure), each emphasize that a superior cybersecurity workforce will promote American prosperity and preserve peace.  America’s cybersecurity workforce is a diverse group of practitioners who govern, design, defend, analyze, administer, operate, and maintain the data, systems, and networks on which our economy and way of life depend.  Whether they are employed in the public or private sectors, they are guardians of our national and economic security.

b)  The United States Government must enhance the workforce mobility of America’s cybersecurity practitioners to improve America’s national cybersecurity.  During their careers, America’s cybersecurity practitioners will serve in various roles for multiple and diverse entities.  United States Government policy must facilitate the seamless movement of cybersecurity practitioners between the public and private sectors, maximizing the contributions made by their diverse skills, experiences, and talents to our Nation.

(c)  The United States Government must support the development of cybersecurity skills and encourage ever-greater excellence so that America can maintain its competitive edge in cybersecurity.  The United States Government must also recognize and reward the country’s highest-performing cybersecurity practitioners and teams.

(d)  The United States Government must create the organizational and technological tools required to maximize the cybersecurity talents and capabilities of American workers –-especially when those talents and capabilities can advance our national and economic security.  The Nation is experiencing a shortage of cybersecurity talent and capability, and innovative approaches are required to improve access to training that maximizes individuals’ cybersecurity knowledge, skills, and abilities.  Training opportunities, such as work-based learning, apprenticeships, and blended learning approaches, must be enhanced for both new workforce entrants and those who are advanced in their careers.

(e)  In accordance with Executive Order 13800, the President will continue to hold heads of executive departments and agencies (agencies) accountable for managing cybersecurity risk to their enterprises, which includes ensuring the effectiveness of their cybersecurity workforces.

Sec. 2.  Strengthening the Federal Cybersecurity Workforce.  (a)  To grow the cybersecurity capability of the United States Government, increase integration of the Federal cybersecurity workforce, and strengthen the skills of Federal information technology and cybersecurity practitioners, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Director of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), shall establish a cybersecurity rotational assignment program, which will serve as a mechanism for knowledge transfer and a development program for cybersecurity practitioners.  Within 90 days of the date of this order, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Directors of OMB and OPM, shall provide a report to the President that describes the proposed program, identifies its resource implications, and recommends actions required for its implementation.  The report shall evaluate how to achieve the following objectives, to the extent permitted by applicable law, as part of the program:

(i)    The non-reimbursable detail of information technology and cybersecurity employees, who are nominated by their employing agencies, to serve at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS);

(ii)   The non-reimbursable detail of experienced cybersecurity DHS employees to other agencies to assist in improving those agencies’ cybersecurity risk management;

(iii)  The use of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education Cybersecurity Workforce Framework (NICE Framework) as the basis for cybersecurity skill requirements for program participants;

(iv)   The provision of training curricula and expansion of learning experiences to develop participants’ skill levels; and

(v)    Peer mentoring to enhance workforce integration.

(b)  Consistent with applicable law and to the maximum extent practicable, the Administrator of General Services, in consultation with the Director of OMB and the Secretary of Commerce, shall:

(i)    Incorporate the NICE Framework lexicon and taxonomy into workforce knowledge and skill requirements used in contracts for information technology and cybersecurity services;

(ii)   Ensure that contracts for information technology and cybersecurity services include reporting requirements that will enable agencies to evaluate whether personnel have the necessary knowledge and skills to perform the tasks specified in the contract, consistent with the NICE Framework; and

(iii)  Provide a report to the President, within 1 year of the date of this order, that describes how the NICE Framework has been incorporated into contracts for information technology and cybersecurity services, evaluates the effectiveness of this approach in improving services provided to the United States Government, and makes recommendations to increase the effective use of the NICE Framework by United States Government contractors.

(c)  Within 180 days of the date of this order, the Director of OPM, in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the heads of other agencies as appropriate, shall identify a list of cybersecurity aptitude assessments for agencies to use in identifying current employees with the potential to acquire cybersecurity skills for placement in reskilling programs to perform cybersecurity work.  Agencies shall incorporate one or more of these assessments into their personnel development programs, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law.

(d)  Agencies shall ensure that existing awards and decorations for the uniformed services and civilian personnel recognize performance and achievements in the areas of cybersecurity and cyber-operations, including by ensuring the availability of awards and decorations equivalent to citations issued pursuant to Executive Order 10694 of January 10, 1957 (Authorizing the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, and Air Force To Issue Citations in the Name of the President of the United States to Military and Naval Units for Outstanding Performance in Action), as amended.  Where necessary and appropriate, agencies shall establish new awards and decorations to recognize performance and achievements in the areas of cybersecurity and cyber-operations.  The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs may recommend to agencies that any cyber unified coordination group or similar ad hoc interagency group that has addressed a significant cybersecurity or cyber-operations-related national security crisis, incident, or effort be recognized for appropriate awards and decorations.

(e)  The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Director of OMB, and the heads of other appropriate agencies, shall develop a plan for an annual cybersecurity competition (President’s Cup Cybersecurity Competition) for Federal civilian and military employees.  The goal of the competition shall be to identify, challenge, and reward the United States Government’s best cybersecurity practitioners and teams across offensive and defensive cybersecurity disciplines.  The plan shall be submitted to the President within 90 days of the date of this order.  The first competition shall be held no later than December 31, 2019, and annually thereafter.  The plan for the competition shall address the following:

(i)    The challenges and benefits of inviting advisers, participants, or observers from non-Federal entities to observe or take part in the competition and recommendations for including them in future competitions, as appropriate;

(ii)   How the Department of Energy, through the National Laboratories, in consultation with the Administrator of the United States Digital Service, can provide expert technical advice and assistance to support the competition, as appropriate;

(iii)  The parameters for the competition, including the     development of multiple individual and team events that test cybersecurity skills related to the NICE Framework and other relevant skills, as appropriate.  These parameters should include competition categories involving individual and team events, software reverse engineering and exploitation, network operations, forensics, big data analysis, cyber analysis, cyber defense, cyber exploitation, secure programming, obfuscated coding, cyber-physical systems, and other disciplines;

(iv)   How to encourage agencies to select their best cybersecurity practitioners as individual and team participants.  Such practitioners should include Federal employees and uniformed services personnel from Federal civilian agencies, as well as Department of Defense active duty military personnel, civilians, and those serving in a drilling reserve capacity in the Armed Forces Reserves or National Guard;

(v)    The extent to which agencies, as well as uniformed services, may develop a President’s Cup awards program that is consistent with applicable law and regulations governing awards and that allows for the provision of cash awards of not less than $25,000.  Any such program shall require the agency to establish an awards program before allowing its employees to participate in the President’s Cup Cybersecurity Competition.  In addition, any such program may not preclude agencies from recognizing winning and non-winning participants through other means, including honorary awards, informal recognition awards, rating-based cash awards, time-off awards, Quality Step Increases, or other agency-based compensation flexibilities as appropriate and consistent with applicable law; and

(vi)   How the uniformed services, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, may designate service members who win these competitions as having skills at a time when there is a critical shortage of such skills within the uniformed services.  The plan should also address how the uniformed services may provide winning service members with a combination of bonuses, advancements, and meritorious recognition to be determined by the Secretaries of the agencies concerned.

(f)  The Director of OMB shall, in consultation with appropriate agencies, develop annually a list of agencies and subdivisions related to cybersecurity that have a primary function of intelligence, counterintelligence, investigative, or national security work, including descriptions of such functions.  The Director of OMB shall provide this list to the President, through the Deputy Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism (DAPHSCT), every year starting September 1, 2019, for consideration of whether those agencies or subdivisions should be exempted from coverage under the Federal Labor-Management Relations Program, consistent with the requirements of section 7103(b)(1) of title 5, United States Code.

Sec. 3.  Strengthening the Nation’s Cybersecurity Workforce.  (a)  The Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretaries), in coordination with the Secretary of Education and the heads of other agencies as the Secretaries determine is appropriate, shall execute, consistent with applicable law and to the greatest extent practicable, the recommendations from the report to the President on Supporting the Growth and Sustainment of the Nation’s Cybersecurity Workforce (Workforce Report) developed pursuant to Executive Order 13800.  The Secretaries shall develop a consultative process that includes Federal, State, territorial, local, and tribal governments, academia, private-sector stakeholders, and other relevant partners to assess and make recommendations to address national cybersecurity workforce needs and to ensure greater mobility in the American cybersecurity workforce.  To fulfill the Workforce Report’s vision of preparing, growing, and sustaining a national cybersecurity workforce that safeguards and promotes America’s national security and economic prosperity, priority consideration will be given to the following imperatives:

(i)    To launch a national Call to Action to draw attention to and mobilize public- and private-sector resources to address cybersecurity workforce needs;

(ii)   To transform, elevate, and sustain the cybersecurity learning environment to grow a dynamic and diverse cybersecurity workforce;

(iii)  To align education and training with employers’ cybersecurity workforce needs, improve coordination, and prepare individuals for lifelong careers; and

(iv)   To establish and use measures that demonstrate the effectiveness and impact of cybersecurity workforce investments.

(b)  To strengthen the ability of the Nation to identify and mitigate cybersecurity vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure and defense systems, particularly cyber-physical systems for which safety and reliability depend on secure control systems, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Energy, and the Secretary of Homeland Security, in coordination with the Director of OPM and the Secretary of Labor, shall provide a report to the President, through the DAPHSCT, within 180 days of the date of this order that:

(i)   Identifies and evaluates skills gaps in Federal and non-Federal cybersecurity personnel and training gaps for specific critical infrastructure sectors, defense critical infrastructure, and the Department of Defense’s platform information technologies; and

(ii)  Recommends curricula for closing the identified skills gaps for Federal personnel and steps the United States Government can take to close such gaps for non-Federal personnel by, for example, supporting the development of similar curricula by education or training providers.

(c)  Within 1 year of the date of this order, the Secretary of Education, in consultation with the DAPHSCT and the National Science Foundation, shall develop and implement, consistent with applicable law, an annual Presidential Cybersecurity Education Award to be presented to one elementary and one secondary school educator per year who best instill skills, knowledge, and passion with respect to cybersecurity and cybersecurity-related subjects.  In developing and implementing this award, the Secretary of Education shall emphasize demonstrated superior educator accomplishment — without respect to research, scholarship, or technology development — as well as academic achievement by the educator’s students.

(d)  The Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Education, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the heads of other appropriate agencies shall encourage the voluntary integration of the NICE Framework into existing education, training, and workforce development efforts undertaken by State, territorial, local, tribal, academic, non‑profit, and private-sector entities, consistent with applicable law.  The Secretary of Commerce shall provide annual updates to the President regarding effective uses of the NICE Framework by non-Federal entities and make recommendations for improving the application of the NICE Framework in cybersecurity education, training, and workforce development.

Sec. 4.  General Provisions.  (a)  Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i)   the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii)  the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b)  This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c)  This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

DONALD J. TRUMP

THE WHITE HOUSE,
May 2, 2019.

Center for Democracy & Technology Warns Department of Homeland Security That Their Mass Surveillance of US Citizens May Violate US Privacy Act

On May 1st 2019, through the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT), a coalition of 103 organizations, lawyers and industry professionals have submitted an open letter to the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) critical off their surveillance of journalists, activists and lawyers domestically here inside the United States. More specifically, the coalition calls out the a sub-division of the DHS known as Customs and Border Protection (CBP), for creating “dossiers on activists, journalists, and lawyers” critical of Trumps governance – whilst also targeting individuals seeking political asylum. They also remain critical of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) for creating national databases on individuals whom have attended “Anti-Trump” protests around the United States since his election in 2016.

The coalition is warning the US Government that such actions may represent a violation of the US Privacy Act of 1974, and are therefore advising them to cease such activity immediately – before any action is formally taken against them. Included in their letter is testimony/evidence from dozens of individuals across the United States caught up within these surveillance programs, revealing just how far the US Government has gone to spy on, threaten or harass its own citizens. Rather than summarize their accounts in this article, I instead invite you to read their testimony first hand through the resources provided below.

Download Copy of Letter: https://cdt.org/files/2019/04/Coalition-Letter-to-DHS-in-opposition-to-surveillance-activity.pdf

Browse Full 8 Page Presentation:

[pdf-embedder url=”https://roguemedia.co/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Coalition-Letter-to-DHS-in-opposition-to-surveillance-activity.pdf”]

Understanding The Weaponization of Modern Cyberspace & The ‘Secret World’ of International Corporate Espionage

This is a concept which needs some explaining, because no one has really ever taken the time to break it down – at least from what I have seen. What you need to understand is that we live in a unique time in world history, and we are all headed towards an equally unique and uncertain future.

What I mean to say is that the 21st century is an exceptionally prosperous time in human history, there is no mass global Wars, there’s no great plague, the majority of us all have running water, plumbing, electricity, refrigeration and the like, we have bikes, cars, automobiles and planes and the entire world can theoretically be accessible/connectable with the click of a button. Not only is the modern 21st century perhaps the single easiest and most peaceful time in human history, but the human race is now also interconnected in ways that prior generations could have never imagined possible.

With that established however, not all is right as rain. For example, over the course of the last several years the United States, Germany, NATO and the like have all gone on to officially declare “cyber space” and “the internet” as the 5th domain/relm of Warfare – joining more traditions domains of Warfare such land, sea, air and space.

Learn More – NATO’s Recognition of Cyberspace As New Domain of Warfare: https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/1029776.pdf

However, as humanity continues to grapple with its understanding and regulation of our new technologies, we are only just now beginning to see/realize the weaponizing of the internet, internet conglomerates and their infrastructure – and this phenomenon is slowly beginning to rear its ugly head across nearly every other aspect of society these days. For example, consider the following evidence.

Google & The Department of Defense

I start off with Google for a number of reasons, chief among them is the fact that they are the single largest and highest grossing firm on the net. As Google is an American business, what you should know is that the company has a number of active contracts with the United States Government – particularly the United States military industrial complex. If you would like an example, look no further than “Project Maven,” a joint military operation currently underway with the help of Google researchers, developers, staff and Artificial Intelligence algorithms – some of which have recently made international headlines.

It should therefore go without saying, but you can not have a contract with the United States military without your full loyalties belonging to them. For this very reason, this also means that enemies of the US Government, or any other international Government agency for that matter, cannot rely on or trust Google to ensure their full security, privacy or look out for their best interests – especially in regards to contentious geo-political issues/events. In other words, as an American-based business and active military contractor, Google is loyal to the US military and for better or worse, has become a de facto branch of/for it – even if no one actually admits this out loud.

Consequentially enough, this is also why Google has always been restricted by “The Great Firewall of China,” and has recently faced banishment from Russia entirely as recently as just a few weeks ago.

Microsoft, Encryption Back-doors & Government Espionage

Similar to Google, Microsoft is yet another American based business with deep running ties to the United States military industrial complex. For example, every computer owned by the US Army and US Cyber Command is now literally mandated to run exclusively on Microsoft Windows 10 software and Operating Systems.

https://twitter.com/MSinDOD/status/770962514406313986

Now, I want you to notice the dates of those two Tweets above – August 29th and 31st, 2016. I bring this up because just a few weeks prior to this, on August 10th 2016, the Kremlin came out with a press release announcing how it was their immediate intention to begin switching all government/military computing systems off Microsoft and on onto domestically produced software – directly because of Microsoft‘s deep running ties with the US Government and US military.

It wasn’t until just a few months after this, in November 2016, that the Kremlin literally called switching over all their software away from Microsofta matter of national security.” Going on to explain how the Kremlin now believes that “software developed by American companies, such as Microsoft, could hide back-doors and bugs that could help other nations spy on their plans.” Also going as far as to say “not replacing foreign IT would be equivalent to dismissing the army.

Read More – Russia’s Plan To Abandon Microsoft & Foreign Software 9/17/2016: https://news.softpedia.com/news/president-elect-donald-trump-can-t-stop-russia-s-war-against-american-software-510294.shtml

If you think this conundrum is unique to Russia, you are mistaken. Believe it or not, Microsoft has similarly been banned from all Government systems in China dating back to 2013. This is when the country first interrogated then political asylum seeker/NSA contractor Edward Snowden, whom revealed that the United States has been secretly using Microsoft to conduct espionage on the Chinese Government and its companies for decades. Not only this, but Microsoft‘s own search engine, Bing, was also banned in China as recently as January 2019 – for essentially all the same reasons.

ZTE & Corporate Espionage

Consequentially enough, this sets me up perfectly for my next bit – America’s banning of the Chinese-based telecommunications conglomerate known as Zhongxing Telecommunication Equipment – otherwise simply referred to as ZTE. Truth be told, I first learned of this news after attempting to go into an AT&T in store in downtown New York City for repairs on my phone, only to find out that AT&T refused to fix my screen because it was a ZTE product – based out of China. They informed me that it was no longer their policy to service and/or fix any Chinese based phone, and advised me to purchase a new American phone – to which I declined, and not respectfully.

Regardless, similar in many ways to to the complaints international Government agencies have been levying against American tech giants for years now, the US has now started levying against other international tech giants/conglomerates. It is just a shame that this information is generally not available or public knowledge to the average American hopelessly wandering around our society.

Kaspersky & US Election Hacking

Along the same lines, throughout the course of 2017, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) made it a top priority to ban Kaspersky Lab anti-virus and other software from all Government systems around the United States. This is because, upon investigation, the US Federal Bureau of Investigation had come to believe that US government employees and personnel were originally compromised via the Kaspersky Lab products they had installed on their devices, which granted the Russian based software conglomerate root access over all their systems. Put more directly, the US Government had come to believe that Kaspersky Lab roots were the whole reason that Russia was able to hack the 2016 Presidential election and US Government employees so easily in the months just before it – especially considering Russian laws requires Russian companies to make all of their data freely accessible to the Kremlin. These laws are also why Kasperky later moved all of their severs out of Russia and into Switzerland by 2018, even though the public damage to the company had already been done.

However, it must also be stated while there was never any cut and dry evidence released indicating that this was indeed the case, at least publicly, and there are still technically court cases ongoing surrounding these allegations, the US Governments ban of Kaspersky has been implemented nonetheless. As a result, Kaspersky has also faced similar bans throughout Europe.

I also don’t know what it says about me, but I just bought a new computer two weeks ago and the first thing I did was install Kaspersky Lab software on it. I also own a ZTE phone 😉.

Facebook & Psychological Warfare

The last two sections of this article are almost exclusive to Rogue Media Labs, at least I have not seen anyone else reporting on these issues outside of Russia. The first is the fact that Facebook has quite literally become a military weapon – and no, I am not talking about Russia’s use of fake news, fake advertisements or propaganda either. While yes, those were huge problems in their own right throughout 2015/2016, new developments as of 2018/2019 are far more troubling and grotesque. More specifically, I am talking about the US Governments use of Facebook as a means of waging so-called “Psychological Warfare” against our adversaries.

Learn More – Russia Bans Military Personnel from Using Social Media To Counter-Act US Sponsored Psych-Ops: https://roguemedia.co/2018/11/09/russia-bans-active-duty-military-personnel-from-sharing-on-social-media/

You may recall a 2017 statement by James Mattis in which he personally stated how, as a result of complacency and improper funding of the US Department of Defense (DoD) under the previous administration, the United States has now fallen behind the rest of the world in several realms of Warfare – such as cyberspace, ultimately allowing the US elections to be hacked in the first place. Regardless, in an effort to ‘catch back up with the rest of the world,’ not only has Trump begun heavily investing back in the US military industrial complex, but we as a nation have also begun experimenting with new, unconventional forms of Warfare. For the purposes of this particular article I would like to talk specifically about Psychological Warfare and our use of Psych-Ops, as well as how these operations can be and are already actively being carried out online – in some instances, exclusively through Facebook.

Read More – US Military Field Manual on Unconventional Warfare: https://roguemedia.co/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/US_Army_Field_Manual_Unconventional_Warfare_2008.pdf

If you were previously unaware, in November of 2018 the Kremlin signed a new piece of legislation into law officially banning all active duty military personnel from owning social media accounts or sharing across social platforms. This is because, at the time, according to the Kremlin itself, social platforms such as Facebook had begun being used to collect “analysis of the activities of the Russian military.” Explaining how “The data shared by the servicemen online is used to apply psychological and information pressure on Russia and its military as well as forming biased opinions on state policies of Russian authorities in society.” Not only this, but the US Government had also taken it a step further by using platforms like Facebook to wage psychological Warfare against Russian soldiers serving abroad in locations such as Syria and Africa.

For example, given that Facebook hosts its servers inside the United States, the US Government has started hijacking their platform in order to pretend to be friends or family members of Russian troops serving abroad. Not only does the US Government do this to organize psychological profiles on individual members of Russia’s military, but in some instances they also use Facebook accounts to cause Russian troops “distress” back home – by faking/fabricating conflicts, arguments or unfortunate circumstances with friends and family back in Russia.This was done to make Russian troops feel as though aspects of their lives were completely falling apart outside of their control back home, thus taking away pride/focus from their military efforts as they served abroad. It may have taken a few months to figure out, but the Kremlin did eventually catch on.

Despite however low down and “dirty” of a trick that is, this remains our current reality – at least under our new Commander In Chief Donald Trump as we continue to exploit American businesses internationally.

Twitter & Spying

I am proud to say that this last bit is exclusive to Rogue Media Labs, because it features research I have personally pieced together over recent months. They say that some of the worlds greatest discoveries were made by accident, and this last bit of news is no different.

The first bit of information I would like to share is something I have already shared a few months ago, which is the fact that Twitter is absolutely using their service to spy on its users. Not only can this be evidenced by the fact that every deleted Tweet attached to an owners account is secretly sent directly to Twitters internal servers, but also by the fact that I have personally caught the service recording one of my private messages with a famous hacker known as Nama Tikure. As previously reported, as I was physically typing it out on screen, a custom key logger built by yours truly accidentally caught Twitter bots clicking on my URL address literally 19 times in a 17 second time period. For some perspective on this, I never even pressed ‘enter’ onto the chat. Meaning that all of these clicks were recorded on my end, with all 19 IP Address ranges listed assigned exclusively to Twitter bots. In other words, I accidentally caught Twitter red hand trying to secretly record and log every last aspect of my private messages – and I am certain this isn’t or wasn’t an isolated incident.

Learn More- Twitter Caught Clandestinely Intercepting The Messages of Its Users: https://roguemedia.co/2019/01/15/twitter-bots-caught-clandestinely-logging-the-private-messages-of-their-users/

The second bit of research is something I accidentally discovered last night, completely unrelated to this article and also 100% accidentally. I could describe it in more detail, but this article is already long enough. So ironically, I instead direct you to the following Tweet…..

Wrapping Things Up

I’m almost embarrassed to admit it, but the whole reason I got riled up enough to write this article was the fact that, upon buying my computer, I was immediately offered 25 GB of free storage from DropBox. Sounds like an amazing deal – right? Who wouldn’t want to jump all over that – right? How generous and caring of a company Dropbox must be! Right?

Well, I’m sorry to 💩 on your parade, so to speak, but that just isn’t exactly the reality of the situation at hand here. I know it’s getting a bit redundant at this point, but the fact of the matter is that Dropbox is a subsidiary – an American subsidiary. Moreover, as the US Governments Supreme Court case with Microsoft proves, as an American company, the US Government has the right to any/all data owned by that company if the Government truly wants it.

See where I am going here? The reason why Dropbox is offering 25 GB of free space to anyone who wants it is so that ignorant sheeple, I mean citizens, will upload all of their data to it – so that the US Government can own all that data themselves. The worst part is the fact that Dropbox is subsidized to mislead you to do exactly this, which is also why they can afford to offer up some much free storage space to so many people for free. I know, yay Capitalism – right? 😏.

US CERT – DHS Releases Emergency Directive In Response To Widespread “Infrastructure Tampering Campaign” Targetting US Executive Branch

Considering that I’ve been a little lost in the world of underground hacks and leaks the last few weeks, I’m not exactly sure how well its been reported in the “Main Stream Media” that part of the US Governments ongoing shutdown involves the temporary laying off of US Government IT workers. Quite literally meaning that nearly every website owned by the US Federal Government is currently out in the open with no one on staff to mitigate attacks or secure them. For example, as was just reported by Netcraft earlier this week, since the shutdown first began “130 TLS certificates used by U.S. government websites have expired without being renewed” – up from 80 just last week.

Full Press Release from Netcraft: https://news.netcraft.com/archives/2019/01/16/manufacturing-gov-and-white-house-security-suffer-under-u-s-shutdown.html

Before moving on, truth be told, I am writing this article following up on a report from Adam Longo, concerning a DDoS attack effecting NASA.gov tonight. For those of you unaware, the site is currently being taken offline via a coordinated DDoS attack at the hands of Mecz1nho Markov – leader of the Brasilian based hacking group Pryzraky. For the purposes of this article, the news serves as a perfect reminder of just one of the small problems presented by the US Government shutdown – strictly in regards to cyber, IT and/or data security.

All of this is important to understand because hackers have been talking about all of this for weeks now, and indubitably countless threat actors have since gone on to do irreparable damage to our Government and US Government systems/server over the same time period of our shutdown. If you need any proof of this, look no further than Emergency Declaration 19-01 issued to the public by US CERT and Department of Homeland Security on January 22nd 2019. In it, the DHS explains how it’s their duty to inform the US public or any Government agencies of any immediate threats presented to their systems, either in live time or into the immediate future. In this particular instance, the DHS is now warning of “DNS Infrastructure Tampering” campaigns actively being carried out by unknown and malicious international threat actors or Advanced Persistent Threats (APT’s).

More specifically, the Department of Homeland Security explains how, dating back to January 10th 2019, their “Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA)” has been “tracking a series of incidentsinvolving Domain Name System (DNS) infrastructure tampering.” Explaining that CISA is now “aware of multiple executive branch agency domains that were impacted by the tampering campaign,” adding that each/every effected agency has since been contacted privately about this matter.

Read Full Emergency Directive from DHS: https://cyber.dhs.gov/ed/19-01/

Now, in my professional experience I know that DNS level attacks usually involve the hijacking of network internet traffic in hopes of either intercepting and stealing said traffic, or cutting off traffic to the end destination – the website itself. For example, this is how Wikileaks was ‘hacked’ by OurMine in 2017. With that said however, DNS level attacks can also lead to the complete hijacking of a websites “Name Servers,” quite literally granting hackers full and complete administrator level control over a website and all of its contents – including every piece of data entered onto the websites back-end, normally shielded from public eye.

In this particular instance, as was explained/described by the DHS themselves in Emergency Directive 19-01 posted above:

In response to the incidents and to stay out ahead of future DNS level attacks like it in the future, the DHS has also submitted to following recommendations for all US Government website administrators:

As stated, all agencies, departments, organizations and websites affiliated with the US Government’s Executive Branch are to conduct full and complete audits of their online systems, DNS records and web traffic – with full reports due back to the DHS by February 5th 2019 at the very latest. From there, Government researchers can begin putting together the full scale of these hacks/attacks, as well as what information the hackers were able to steal – and for how long. Possibly implicated under the umbrella of the US Executive Branch are the US Military, White House, Immigration and Custom Enforcement, National Security Agency, as well as state and local law enforcement agencies – among many others.

Additionally, once again given my experience, I do not think it would be unreasonable to speculate that we won’t see any of the information uncovered by hackers the last few weeks for quite some time down the road. Say for example the start of the 2020 US Presidential election season, which due to kick off in less than 12 months time. If I had a guess, I would assume that any information targeted by hackers over the last two weeks was acquired specifically for this very purpose; to interfere with and/or manipulate the course of the 2020 US Presidential elections. Though even I admit that statement is merely speculative and remains to be seen.